Kitsap County Public Health COVID Response

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Recent Updates


  • COVID-19 VACCINE UPDATE: Washington state is recommending healthcare providers vaccinate people eligible under Phase 1b Tier 1 of vaccination. However, supplies are very limited and vaccine providers may not have appointments available immediately. See our vaccine page for details.

  • NEW PHASED REOPENING PLAN: Kitsap County is in Phase 1 of the state’s new Healthy Washington plan for COVID-19 recovery. Learn more and find links to guidance on our new Healthy Washington page.


Vaccine Updates Data Page School Page
Explore state and county data from the Washington State Department of Health.
Learn more about the COVID-19 testing process in Washington.
Learn more about how Kitsap Public Health investigates and reports COVID-19 cases.

This page will be updated weekly with information about COVID-19 outbreaks in Kitsap County. Outbreaks that meet the case threshold for a facility to be identified by name will be reported as soon as information becomes available. This page is under development and will continue to be revised and expanded.


OUTBREAKS IN LONG-TERM CARE & RESIDENTIAL CARE FACILITIES


Definition: Per guidance from the state Department of Health, an outbreak at a long-term care or residential care facility is defined as one resident or health care worker with confirmed COVID-19. See the guidance document for additional criteria.


Identifying facilities: To protect the private health information of residents and employees, facilities will be identified by name if 10 or more cases associated with an outbreak are reported (see Department of Health guidance for small numbers reporting). People who are concerned about COVID-19 activity at a specific facility are encouraged to contact the facility directly.


Long-term care facility outbreaks with 10 or more cases

As of Jan. 21, 2021
Facility Location COVID-19 Cases Outbreak status*
Life Care Center South Kitsap 52 Closed
Martha & Mary North Kitsap 40 Closed
Forest Ridge Bremerton 116 Active
Stafford Healthcare at Belmont Bremerton 98 Active
Washington Veteran Home Port Orchard 20 Active
Harbor House North Kitsap 14 Active
Liberty Shores North Kitsap 13 Active


Long-term care facility outbreak summary:
LTC outbreaks reported to date: 35
LTC outbreak-associated cases to date: 419
Active LTC outbreaks: 9*


Residential care facility outbreaks with 10 or more cases

As of Jan. 21, 2021
Facility Location COVID-19 Cases Outbreak status*
Olalla Recovery Centers South Kitsap 13 Closed


*Outbreaks are listed as “active” if an associated case has been identified in the past 28 days. Outbreaks will be listed as “closed” when no new cases have been reported in 28 days.


More long-term care resources:


OUTBREAKS IN NON-LONG-TERM CARE SETTINGS


HEALTHY WASHINGTON — ROADMAP FOR RECOVERY

Healthy Washington is the state’s new phased approach for COVID-19 recovery taking effect Jan. 11. Healthy Washington takes a regional approach to reopening. The governor’s office has posted basic information about the plan.

Kitsap County is included in the "Northwest Region" with Clallam, Jefferson, and Mason counties. Kitsap will move between phases with the three other counties, based on metrics tracked across the Northwest Region. The Northwest Region is currently in Phase 1. Learn more.




WHO SHOULD GET TESTED?

The Washington State Department of Health recommends testing for:


  • Anyone who has symptoms consistent with COVID-19, even if their illness is mild. Learn more about COVID-19 symptoms on the CDC’s website.
Get Tested

 

Visit the state Department of Health’s website for more information about COVID-19 testing, including cost.

 


WHERE CAN I GET TESTED IN KITSAP?

 

 



WHY SHOULD I GET TESTED?


Testing is an important tool in our response to the coronavirus pandemic. When someone is diagnosed with COVID-19, we help them take steps to avoid spreading the virus to others and notify people they have been in close contact with. Testing also provides data needed assess the level of illness in our community as we make progress toward recovery.


WHAT TYPE OF TEST SHOULD I GET?


If you have COVID-19 symptoms, or have been exposed to COVID-19, you should get a viral (PCR) test. Only a PCR test can confirm that you have COVID-19.


WHAT ABOUT ANTIBODY (SEROLOGY) TESTING?


Antibody tests (or serology tests) analyze a blood sample to determine if a person was exposed to a virus in the past. An antibody test cannot confirm if a person currently has COVID-19.


More research is needed to understand if having antibodies to the virus that causes COVID-19 will protect someone from getting COVID-19 in the future, or how long that protection might last. A positive antibody test does not mean a person is immune to COVID-19.


Learn more about COVID-19 tests.

COVID-19 Dashboard

We need to keep our community healthy and resilient as we work together to overcome the challenges created by the COVID-19 pandemic.


While many of us have had our regular routines disrupted, it is still important to stay on top of preventive care and treatment of chronic conditions. Skipping a wellness checkup or postponing an immunization could put your health or your family’s health at risk. Health care providers are working hard to ensure clinics and hospitals are safe for everyone to visit.


COVID-19 Dashboard

If you have lost income or health insurance during the pandemic, go to wahealthplanfinder.org to learn about health coverage options.


DON’T DELAY SEEKING EMERGENCY CARE


It is critical to immediately seek medical care if you or someone in your household is experiencing a health emergency. Our local hospitals have not been overwhelmed during the COVID-19 pandemic and people should not avoid seeking emergency care.


Not sure when to go to call 911 or go to a hospital? The Washington State Department of Health has helpful tips.


COVID-19 Dashboard

CALL 911 AT THE FIRST SIGN OF A HEART ATTACK OR STROKE


If you experience symptoms of a heart attack or stroke, or witness the signs in another person, call 9–1–1. Learn more about the signs and symptoms from the American Heart Association.

When to wear face coverings

Effective June 26, a statewide order will require people to wear face coverings in indoor public spaces such as stores, offices and restaurants. The order will also require face coverings in outdoor settings where people cannot stay 6 feet apart.


There are exemptions, including for people with certain disabilities or health conditions, people who are deaf or hard of hearing, and children under the age of 5 (though it's encouraged to have children ages 3-5 wear a covering if possible). Read more about the face covering requirement.


When to wear face coverings

Here are some important points to know about face coverings:


  • Face coverings are not a substitute for other protective measures. It is critical to stay home as much as possible, wash hands often, disinfect frequently used objects, and stay at least six feet from people outside your household.
  • Avoid crowded areas whenever possible. Find a different place to go or come back another time unless your visit is absolutely essential. You are at risk of getting COVID-19 even if you are wearing a face covering..
  • Use cloth face coverings. Do not use medical masks or respirators. You can make face coverings at home or purchase them.
  • Some people cannot wear face coverings. Be kind to people around you who are not wearing face coverings. Focus on making good decisions for yourself and your family.
  • Face coverings should not be placed on children younger than 2. Older children should be supervised while wearing face coverings.
  • Face coverings help protect people around you. Studies indicate face coverings are most effective for preventing the wearer from spreading respiratory droplets when they cough, sneeze, or talk. Face coverings are less effective for protecting the wearer from droplets spread by other people.

MORE GUIDANCE:

COVID-19 is an illness caused by a new type of coronavirus. Most people who have COVID-19 experience mild illness similar to a cold or flu.


Some people are at higher risk for severe illness, including:


  • People with certain health conditions
  • Older adults

Visit the CDC’s website for information about risk groups and special guidance.


People with COVID-19 have experienced a wide range of symptoms. Symptoms can appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus. COVID-19 symptoms include:


  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea
COVID-19 Protect Your Health
Protect Your Health
(English/Español)
COVID-19 Fact Sheet
What is
Contact Tracing?
COVID-19 Fact Sheet Have Fun,
Stay Healthy


COVID-19 Fact Sheet Printable COVID-19
Fact Sheet
COVID-19 Fact Sheet Hoja informative de
COVID-19

COVID-19 signs for businesses / signos para empresas


These posters educate customers and staff on steps being taken to prevent the spread of COVID-19.


In English


COVID-19 Fact Sheet
For grocery stores

En Español


COVID-19 Fact Sheet
Para tiendas de
abarrotes en español

Social Distancing - maintain at least 6 feet.
For restaurants
COVID-19 Fact Sheet
Para restaurante
en español

COVID-19 Fact Sheet
For housing communities
COVID-19 Fact Sheet
Para comunidades de
viviendas en español

COVID-19 Fact Sheet
For childcare centers
Social Distancing - maintain at least 6 feet.
Para guarderías en español


The Washington State Department of Health has more COVID-19 fact sheets available in multiple languages.

The Kitsap Public Health District is working closely with the Washington State Department of Health and the Kitsap County Department of Emergency Management to respond to the COVID-19 outbreak. Our activities include:


  • Investigating COVID-19 cases in Kitsap and notifying people identified as having been in close contact with confirmed cases.
  • Providing guidance to Kitsap health care providers.
  • Sharing information with local agencies, organizations, businesses and community groups.
  • Providing daily updates to the public and news media.
  • Encouraging Kitsap residents to take steps to protect their health and the health of their community.
  • Providing education about social distancing measures.
Kitsap Data Reports
COVID-19 Fact Sheet
Kitsap COVID-19
Risk Assessment Dashboard
- Updated Weekly -

COVID-19 Fact Sheet
Kitsap COVID-19
Weekly Report
Kitsap Lab-Confirmed COVID-19 Case Details Kitsap COVID-19
Community Survey

Kitsap Lab-Confirmed COVID-19 Case Details Kitsap Lab-Confirmed COVID-19 Case Characteristics

Printable Fact Sheets
We Need Your Help WE NEED YOUR HELP

We Need Your Help NOSOTROS NECESITAMOS TU AYUDA

PROTECT YOUR HEALTH
PROTÉGE SU SALUD PROTECT YOUR HEALTH
PROTÉGE SU SALUD

FEEL SICK? GET TESTED ¿SE SIENTE ENFERMO? UNA PRUEBA FEEL SICK? GET TESTED
¿SE SIENTE ENFERMO? UNA PRUEBA

Have Fun, Stay Safe Have Fun, Stay Safe
COVID-19 Fact Sheet Wearing Face Coverings


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